Children’s Explorations in an Art Center

In my combined first and second grade classes, children freely participated in the art center during Choice Time.

Readily available materials bought with school supply money included: all types of paper; scissors, pencils, crayons, and felt pens; masking tape and scotch tape; staplers; craft sticks; string and yarn; wallpaper books; paint; rulers; and plasticine. Then parents supplied a huge variety of junk materials.

It has been long understood that when children are participating in art, they are in a process that includes nourishing expression, an acuteness of the senses, experimentation and risk-taking, developing imagination, and creative development. However, in addition to these assets, it’s also another way of communicating.

Much of art for the young child involves exploring a wide range of materials. It should include the process that is emphasized. When children were given directions for making a product, like making a present for their parents, I didn’t consider it art. It may have been following directions and the product important, and it may have been very attractive and artistic and a valuable activity in itself – but it wasn’t art for young children. It wasn’t using materials creatively. One’s own creations allow a child to thrive and grow emotionally and cognitively.

Young children’s initial art experience is pure investigation, but as they grow older and have more involvement, the maturity of their art unfolds. With various materials, there were three stages while making collages, working with clay, and with different types of painting. At first there’s pure exploration with sometimes smearing and dabbling. Sometime in the middle of messing around, an idea begins to take place. This stage is finally replaced with attempts to replicate a preconceived idea.

When participating in art activities using their own ideas, children are learning a tremendous amount. Using many materials, they are learning about similarities and differences, transformations and reversibility, and opportunities for overcoming egocentricity during any type of construction, constantly seeing all sides of a structure. So, they have opportunities to develop the very same cognitive traits necessary to succeed in academic areas.

Read more about Choice Time and programs in my book, Early Childhood Programs: Opportunities for Academic, Cognitive, and Personal Success. Included is a web site where programs and activities can be downloaded for use in a classroom. Also, see 7 reviews on www.amazon.com

   Teaching Young Children © Peggy Broadbent 2011 - All Rights Reserved